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Democracy Now! Interviews the (Tax) Dodgers: Going to Bat for the 1%
link to full article

At the May Day rally in New York City’s Union Square, Amy Goodman bumped into the Tax Dodgers — a baseball team on which all of the players share the same number: 1 percent.
ALEC DICKMAN, TAX DODGER: We’re a baseball team, and we go to bat for the 1 percent, not the 99 percent. We’re the Tax Dodgers, the best team that corporate money can buy.
AMY GOODMAN: And can you describe what you’ve got here?
ALEC DICKMAN: Well, we’ve got our full baseball team out here, and we’ve got all the best heavy hitters in corporate America who are part of our team: Verizon, GE, Citibank, ExxonMobil, Pfizer, Bank of America, Time Warner. You know them all. We’re practically household names at this point.
AMY GOODMAN: And what’s this that we’ve got here? It says “Loopholes”?
ALEC DICKMAN: Well, no baseball team is complete without their cheerleaders, and these are our corporate hula hoopers, the Loopholes.
AMY GOODMAN: Can you tell me who you are?
CORPORATE LOOPHOLE: I’m a corporate loophole. I’m what allows these guys to get out of paying taxes and to receive rebates that are billions of dollars beyong.
AMY GOODMAN: So are you guys a winning team?
ALEC DICKMAN: We always win, because we bought the refs, and we own the stadium, and we get to change the scoreboard.
GENERAL ELECTRIC, TAX DODGER: The game is rigged.
ALEC DICKMAN: The game is rigged.
GENERAL ELECTRIC: The game is rigged.
MAN WITH MONEY BAGS: Thanks for my new boat.
AMY GOODMAN: What did you say?
MAN WITH MONEY BAGS: Thanks for my new boat. You should come see it.
AMY GOODMAN: So, why are you smiling then? You’d think—I mean, baseball is sort of supposed to be like good for America. You think you guys are good for America?
ALEC DICKMAN: Well, you know, what’s good for the 1 percent isn’t necessarily good for America. And we know a lot of people are out there suffering, and they paid their taxes in order to make some sort of sacrifice for the common good. But for us, Tax Day is payday. Some of the biggest corporations in America actually make money on Tax Day. For example, GE, which made over $4 billion in profits, then paid no taxes and got $3 billion in tax refunds and rebates. That’s a negative-76 percent tax rate. So that’s all money that’s coming back to us.
AMY GOODMAN: GE, you mean General Electric.
ALEC DICKMAN: General Electric.
AMY GOODMAN: Isn’t that headed by Jeffrey Immelt, President Obama’s drug czar?
ALEC DICKMAN: Yeah, that’s absolutely true. But, you know, we’re able to—we’re a very elite team, so we get wined and dined by, you know, everyone in the country, including the President.
AMY GOODMAN: What’s your name?
ALEC DICKMAN: My name is Alec Dickman.
AMY GOODMAN: And what about everyone else? Are you—what base do you play, or what position?
GENERAL ELECTRIC: I’m the heavy hitter, the cleanup. I represent GE.
AMY GOODMAN: How about you?
BANK OF AMERICA, TAX DODGER: I’m Bank of America. I’m a job creator, so, you know, all that tax revenue is really helping get the economy going, so keep it coming. Keep it coming.
AMY GOODMAN: How about you?
VERIZON, TAX DODGER: I’m Verizon.
AMY GOODMAN: You are.
VERIZON: Yes.
AMY GOODMAN: And what are you doing with that bat?
VERIZON: With this bat, I’m ready to knock one out of left field for the 1 percent.
AMY GOODMAN: And how about you?
GENERAL ELECTRIC 2, TAX DODGER: Me? I’m General Electric.
AMY GOODMAN: There’s two General Electrics here.
GENERAL ELECTRIC 2: That’s OK. We play in twos when it’s corporate America.
ALEC DICKMAN: We don’t need to play fair.
AMY GOODMAN: OK, well, thanks very much.
ALEC DICKMAN: You want a song?
AMY GOODMAN: You have a song?
ALEC DICKMAN: Oh, we’ve got a song. You guys—
GENERAL ELECTRIC 2: Oh, yeah.
ALEC DICKMAN: Keeping it clean, keeping it clean.
GENERAL ELECTRIC 2: All right.
ALEC DICKMAN: Here we go! We got a song for y’all today!
TAX DODGERS: [singing] Take me out to the tax gameBail me out with the banksBuy me a bonus and tax rebateNever pay nothing, not federal or stateSo just shoot, shoot, shoot for the loopholesIt’s law, so you can’t complainWhere the one, two, three trillion you’re outSince we rigged the game.
Take me out to the tax gameFlip the bird to the crowdLosers pay taxes, we take rebatesCause we make the rules for the corporate stateAnd it’s wham, bam, slam through the loopholesWe always win, what a game!We’re the one, yes, the 1 percentAnd we have no shame!
ALEC DICKMAN: Go back to work, everyone! Strike’s over!
GENERAL ELECTRIC: Thanks for paying your taxes so we don’t have to!
GENERAL ELECTRIC 2: Get a job in China, will ya?
OCCUPONIC: We are the Occuponics, and we are the house band for the Tax Dodgers. They pay us a lot of money. I used to be in the 99 percent, but they bought me out.

Democracy Now! Interviews the (Tax) Dodgers: Going to Bat for the 1%

link to full article

At the May Day rally in New York City’s Union Square, Amy Goodman bumped into the Tax Dodgers — a baseball team on which all of the players share the same number: 1 percent.

ALEC DICKMANTAX DODGER: We’re a baseball team, and we go to bat for the 1 percent, not the 99 percent. We’re the Tax Dodgers, the best team that corporate money can buy.

AMY GOODMAN: And can you describe what you’ve got here?

ALEC DICKMAN: Well, we’ve got our full baseball team out here, and we’ve got all the best heavy hitters in corporate America who are part of our team: Verizon, GE, Citibank, ExxonMobil, Pfizer, Bank of America, Time Warner. You know them all. We’re practically household names at this point.

AMY GOODMAN: And what’s this that we’ve got here? It says “Loopholes”?

ALEC DICKMAN: Well, no baseball team is complete without their cheerleaders, and these are our corporate hula hoopers, the Loopholes.

AMY GOODMAN: Can you tell me who you are?

CORPORATE LOOPHOLE: I’m a corporate loophole. I’m what allows these guys to get out of paying taxes and to receive rebates that are billions of dollars beyong.

AMY GOODMAN: So are you guys a winning team?

ALEC DICKMAN: We always win, because we bought the refs, and we own the stadium, and we get to change the scoreboard.

GENERAL ELECTRICTAX DODGER: The game is rigged.

ALEC DICKMAN: The game is rigged.

GENERAL ELECTRIC: The game is rigged.

MAN WITH MONEY BAGS: Thanks for my new boat.

AMY GOODMAN: What did you say?

MAN WITH MONEY BAGS: Thanks for my new boat. You should come see it.

AMY GOODMAN: So, why are you smiling then? You’d think—I mean, baseball is sort of supposed to be like good for America. You think you guys are good for America?

ALEC DICKMAN: Well, you know, what’s good for the 1 percent isn’t necessarily good for America. And we know a lot of people are out there suffering, and they paid their taxes in order to make some sort of sacrifice for the common good. But for us, Tax Day is payday. Some of the biggest corporations in America actually make money on Tax Day. For example, GE, which made over $4 billion in profits, then paid no taxes and got $3 billion in tax refunds and rebates. That’s a negative-76 percent tax rate. So that’s all money that’s coming back to us.

AMY GOODMAN: GE, you mean General Electric.

ALEC DICKMAN: General Electric.

AMY GOODMAN: Isn’t that headed by Jeffrey Immelt, President Obama’s drug czar?

ALEC DICKMAN: Yeah, that’s absolutely true. But, you know, we’re able to—we’re a very elite team, so we get wined and dined by, you know, everyone in the country, including the President.

AMY GOODMAN: What’s your name?

ALEC DICKMAN: My name is Alec Dickman.

AMY GOODMAN: And what about everyone else? Are you—what base do you play, or what position?

GENERAL ELECTRIC: I’m the heavy hitter, the cleanup. I represent GE.

AMY GOODMAN: How about you?

BANK OF AMERICATAX DODGER: I’m Bank of America. I’m a job creator, so, you know, all that tax revenue is really helping get the economy going, so keep it coming. Keep it coming.

AMY GOODMAN: How about you?

VERIZONTAX DODGER: I’m Verizon.

AMY GOODMAN: You are.

VERIZON: Yes.

AMY GOODMAN: And what are you doing with that bat?

VERIZON: With this bat, I’m ready to knock one out of left field for the 1 percent.

AMY GOODMAN: And how about you?

GENERAL ELECTRIC 2, TAX DODGER: Me? I’m General Electric.

AMY GOODMAN: There’s two General Electrics here.

GENERAL ELECTRIC 2: That’s OK. We play in twos when it’s corporate America.

ALEC DICKMAN: We don’t need to play fair.

AMY GOODMAN: OK, well, thanks very much.

ALEC DICKMAN: You want a song?

AMY GOODMAN: You have a song?

ALEC DICKMAN: Oh, we’ve got a song. You guys—

GENERAL ELECTRIC 2: Oh, yeah.

ALEC DICKMAN: Keeping it clean, keeping it clean.

GENERAL ELECTRIC 2: All right.

ALEC DICKMAN: Here we go! We got a song for y’all today!

TAX DODGERS: [singing] Take me out to the tax game
Bail me out with the banks
Buy me a bonus and tax rebate
Never pay nothing, not federal or state
So just shoot, shoot, shoot for the loopholes
It’s law, so you can’t complain
Where the one, two, three trillion you’re out
Since we rigged the game.

Take me out to the tax game
Flip the bird to the crowd
Losers pay taxes, we take rebates
Cause we make the rules for the corporate state
And it’s wham, bam, slam through the loopholes
We always win, what a game!
We’re the one, yes, the 1 percent
And we have no shame!

ALEC DICKMAN: Go back to work, everyone! Strike’s over!

GENERAL ELECTRIC: Thanks for paying your taxes so we don’t have to!

GENERAL ELECTRIC 2: Get a job in China, will ya?

OCCUPONIC: We are the Occuponics, and we are the house band for the Tax Dodgers. They pay us a lot of money. I used to be in the 99 percent, but they bought me out.


Protest Gets a Pedestal Among Baseball’s Greats
By COLIN MOYNIHAN
Published: July 22, 2012
Some of the thousands of people who gathered in Cooperstown, N.Y., on Sunday for the annual induction ceremony into the National Baseball Hall of Fame no doubt visited the attached museum to gaze at items connected to memorable moments or the greats of the game.
But one display, near the center of an exhibit called “Today’s Game,” may have surprised some visitors because of its ties to the Occupy Wall Street movement.
Inside a glass case was a white jersey with flowing blue lettering and a blue hat that might seem vaguely familiar to Brooklynites of a certain vintage. The team name, however, was the Tax Dodgers; the hat displayed a 1 percent logo.

The items, which were donated by a satirical street theater group tied to Occupy Wall Street, have been included in the Hall of Fame Museum not because of their political content but because they reflect baseball’s prominent place in the national landscape, said Tom Shieber, senior curator at the museum.
“Baseball is a pervasive part of the American vernacular,” Mr. Shieber said. “It’s a language we all speak.”
The idea to form the Tax Dodgers came early in 2012. A group of Occupy Wall Street activists formed a street theater group to satirize people and companies that use lobbying or loopholes to lower the amount of taxes they pay or to eliminate payments altogether.
The group roamed through Midtown Manhattan on tax day, April 17, swinging baseball bats and singing about economic deception to the tune of “Take Me Out to the Ball Game.” They visited the Eighth Avenue post office where last-minute filers were standing in line, said Gan Golan, a member of the group, and brought a giant cardboard baseball mitt, emblazoned with the word “Mitt,” to a Romney fund-raiser at the Trump Tower on Fifth Avenue.
As a result of such appearances, the Tax Dodgers gained a modest following, and a friend of Mr. Shieber’s sent him a clip of the group in action. Mr. Shieber said he was interested in how the group used baseball imagery to communicate a political message, something that many others had done in the past.
For instance, Mr. Shieber said, the museum already owned sheet music for patriotic songs written in 1943 that used baseball metaphors to buoy spirits during World War II, and it had a Currier and Ives lithograph from 1860 depicting Abraham Lincoln and other presidential candidates using baseball idioms to analyze their electoral prospects.
Mr. Shieber asked the Tax Dodgers if they would donate a uniform, and the group sent one by overnight mail. In July, several members of the team drove to Cooperstown, in uniform and accompanied by two cheerleaders. They arrived to find one of their shirts along with a 1 percent cap and a plaque designed by the museum. Next to it was the bat that the Texas Rangers outfielder Josh Hamilton had used on May 8 to hit four home runs in one game.
Mr. Golan, 38, an artist and writer who moved from Oakland to Brooklyn when Occupy protests began last fall, said that he was pleased with the display and hoped that it would help the group’s message reach a wider audience. He added that he had never expected the Tax Dodgers to gain the company of players like Willie Mays and Walter Johnson.
“We’re playing the bad guys, and those guys are heroes,” he said.
—————————————————————————-
A version of this article appeared in print on July 23, 2012, on page A18 of the New York edition with the headline: Protest Gets a Pedestal Among Baseball’s Greats.

Protest Gets a Pedestal Among Baseball’s Greats

By COLIN MOYNIHAN

Published: July 22, 2012

Some of the thousands of people who gathered in Cooperstown, N.Y., on Sunday for the annual induction ceremony into the National Baseball Hall of Fame no doubt visited the attached museum to gaze at items connected to memorable moments or the greats of the game.

But one display, near the center of an exhibit called “Today’s Game,” may have surprised some visitors because of its ties to the Occupy Wall Street movement.

Inside a glass case was a white jersey with flowing blue lettering and a blue hat that might seem vaguely familiar to Brooklynites of a certain vintage. The team name, however, was the Tax Dodgers; the hat displayed a 1 percent logo.

TAXDODGE-popup.jpg

The items, which were donated by a satirical street theater group tied to Occupy Wall Street, have been included in the Hall of Fame Museum not because of their political content but because they reflect baseball’s prominent place in the national landscape, said Tom Shieber, senior curator at the museum.

“Baseball is a pervasive part of the American vernacular,” Mr. Shieber said. “It’s a language we all speak.”

The idea to form the Tax Dodgers came early in 2012. A group of Occupy Wall Street activists formed a street theater group to satirize people and companies that use lobbying or loopholes to lower the amount of taxes they pay or to eliminate payments altogether.

The group roamed through Midtown Manhattan on tax day, April 17, swinging baseball bats and singing about economic deception to the tune of “Take Me Out to the Ball Game.” They visited the Eighth Avenue post office where last-minute filers were standing in line, said Gan Golan, a member of the group, and brought a giant cardboard baseball mitt, emblazoned with the word “Mitt,” to a Romney fund-raiser at the Trump Tower on Fifth Avenue.

As a result of such appearances, the Tax Dodgers gained a modest following, and a friend of Mr. Shieber’s sent him a clip of the group in action. Mr. Shieber said he was interested in how the group used baseball imagery to communicate a political message, something that many others had done in the past.

For instance, Mr. Shieber said, the museum already owned sheet music for patriotic songs written in 1943 that used baseball metaphors to buoy spirits during World War II, and it had a Currier and Ives lithograph from 1860 depicting Abraham Lincoln and other presidential candidates using baseball idioms to analyze their electoral prospects.

Mr. Shieber asked the Tax Dodgers if they would donate a uniform, and the group sent one by overnight mail. In July, several members of the team drove to Cooperstown, in uniform and accompanied by two cheerleaders. They arrived to find one of their shirts along with a 1 percent cap and a plaque designed by the museum. Next to it was the bat that the Texas Rangers outfielder Josh Hamilton had used on May 8 to hit four home runs in one game.

Mr. Golan, 38, an artist and writer who moved from Oakland to Brooklyn when Occupy protests began last fall, said that he was pleased with the display and hoped that it would help the group’s message reach a wider audience. He added that he had never expected the Tax Dodgers to gain the company of players like Willie Mays and Walter Johnson.

“We’re playing the bad guys, and those guys are heroes,” he said.

—————————————————————————-

A version of this article appeared in print on July 23, 2012, on page A18 of the New York edition with the headline: Protest Gets a Pedestal Among Baseball’s Greats.

A NEW FOOTBALL TEAM!
THE NY 99ERS TAKE THE FIELD

(Video from CNN iReport)
On the day of the NFL Draft Pick, and at the same time that Mitt Romney was holding a private fundraiser with fellow 1 percenter and NY Jets Owner, a new football team, the NY 99ers, appeared on the scene. They stormed the Marriot Marquis hotel in Times Square where the meeting was taking place, chanting: “We. Are. The 99%. Hoowah!”
The text of their speech follows: 
MEDIA COVERAGE:
MSNBC: The Ed Show - NY 99ers form defensive line 


PHOTOS:



    

A NEW FOOTBALL TEAM!

THE NY 99ERS TAKE THE FIELD

image

(Video from CNN iReport)

On the day of the NFL Draft Pick, and at the same time that Mitt Romney was holding a private fundraiser with fellow 1 percenter and NY Jets Owner, a new football team, the NY 99ers, appeared on the scene. They stormed the Marriot Marquis hotel in Times Square where the meeting was taking place, chanting: “We. Are. The 99%. Hoowah!”

The text of their speech follows: 

MEDIA COVERAGE:

MSNBC: The Ed Show - NY 99ers form defensive line 

PHOTOS:

image

image

image

image  image  image

Why build a library in honor of someone who does not even like to read? Instead, we proudly present The George W. Bush Librarium, an interactive theme park.

Why build a library in honor of someone who does not even like to read? Instead, we proudly present The George W. Bush Librarium, an interactive theme park.

A PENNY FOR YOUR TAXES
On Tax Day, April 17th, the Tax Dodgers baseball team and members of United NY took to the streets and distributed thousands of envelopes to bystanders with a label  ’REAL MONEY’ on the front. As each person took the envelope, they were told that inside each envelope was an amount of money greater than the taxes that GE, Verizon, Bank of America and a number of other corporations paid in taxes combined. All true. 
When they opened the envelopes, they found a single penny. It was glued to the following message: 

A PENNY FOR YOUR TAXES

On Tax Day, April 17th, the Tax Dodgers baseball team and members of United NY took to the streets and distributed thousands of envelopes to bystanders with a label  ’REAL MONEY’ on the front. As each person took the envelope, they were told that inside each envelope was an amount of money greater than the taxes that GE, Verizon, Bank of America and a number of other corporations paid in taxes combined. All true. 

When they opened the envelopes, they found a single penny. It was glued to the following message: 

Photobucket

Photobucket


F@#k THE SMURFS! 
Check out  THE SERFS!

Photobucket

F@#k THE SMURFS!

Check out  THE SERFS!

Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket

Democracy Now! Interviews the (Tax) Dodgers: Going to Bat for the 1%
link to full article

At the May Day rally in New York City’s Union Square, Amy Goodman bumped into the Tax Dodgers — a baseball team on which all of the players share the same number: 1 percent.
ALEC DICKMAN, TAX DODGER: We’re a baseball team, and we go to bat for the 1 percent, not the 99 percent. We’re the Tax Dodgers, the best team that corporate money can buy.
AMY GOODMAN: And can you describe what you’ve got here?
ALEC DICKMAN: Well, we’ve got our full baseball team out here, and we’ve got all the best heavy hitters in corporate America who are part of our team: Verizon, GE, Citibank, ExxonMobil, Pfizer, Bank of America, Time Warner. You know them all. We’re practically household names at this point.
AMY GOODMAN: And what’s this that we’ve got here? It says “Loopholes”?
ALEC DICKMAN: Well, no baseball team is complete without their cheerleaders, and these are our corporate hula hoopers, the Loopholes.
AMY GOODMAN: Can you tell me who you are?
CORPORATE LOOPHOLE: I’m a corporate loophole. I’m what allows these guys to get out of paying taxes and to receive rebates that are billions of dollars beyong.
AMY GOODMAN: So are you guys a winning team?
ALEC DICKMAN: We always win, because we bought the refs, and we own the stadium, and we get to change the scoreboard.
GENERAL ELECTRIC, TAX DODGER: The game is rigged.
ALEC DICKMAN: The game is rigged.
GENERAL ELECTRIC: The game is rigged.
MAN WITH MONEY BAGS: Thanks for my new boat.
AMY GOODMAN: What did you say?
MAN WITH MONEY BAGS: Thanks for my new boat. You should come see it.
AMY GOODMAN: So, why are you smiling then? You’d think—I mean, baseball is sort of supposed to be like good for America. You think you guys are good for America?
ALEC DICKMAN: Well, you know, what’s good for the 1 percent isn’t necessarily good for America. And we know a lot of people are out there suffering, and they paid their taxes in order to make some sort of sacrifice for the common good. But for us, Tax Day is payday. Some of the biggest corporations in America actually make money on Tax Day. For example, GE, which made over $4 billion in profits, then paid no taxes and got $3 billion in tax refunds and rebates. That’s a negative-76 percent tax rate. So that’s all money that’s coming back to us.
AMY GOODMAN: GE, you mean General Electric.
ALEC DICKMAN: General Electric.
AMY GOODMAN: Isn’t that headed by Jeffrey Immelt, President Obama’s drug czar?
ALEC DICKMAN: Yeah, that’s absolutely true. But, you know, we’re able to—we’re a very elite team, so we get wined and dined by, you know, everyone in the country, including the President.
AMY GOODMAN: What’s your name?
ALEC DICKMAN: My name is Alec Dickman.
AMY GOODMAN: And what about everyone else? Are you—what base do you play, or what position?
GENERAL ELECTRIC: I’m the heavy hitter, the cleanup. I represent GE.
AMY GOODMAN: How about you?
BANK OF AMERICA, TAX DODGER: I’m Bank of America. I’m a job creator, so, you know, all that tax revenue is really helping get the economy going, so keep it coming. Keep it coming.
AMY GOODMAN: How about you?
VERIZON, TAX DODGER: I’m Verizon.
AMY GOODMAN: You are.
VERIZON: Yes.
AMY GOODMAN: And what are you doing with that bat?
VERIZON: With this bat, I’m ready to knock one out of left field for the 1 percent.
AMY GOODMAN: And how about you?
GENERAL ELECTRIC 2, TAX DODGER: Me? I’m General Electric.
AMY GOODMAN: There’s two General Electrics here.
GENERAL ELECTRIC 2: That’s OK. We play in twos when it’s corporate America.
ALEC DICKMAN: We don’t need to play fair.
AMY GOODMAN: OK, well, thanks very much.
ALEC DICKMAN: You want a song?
AMY GOODMAN: You have a song?
ALEC DICKMAN: Oh, we’ve got a song. You guys—
GENERAL ELECTRIC 2: Oh, yeah.
ALEC DICKMAN: Keeping it clean, keeping it clean.
GENERAL ELECTRIC 2: All right.
ALEC DICKMAN: Here we go! We got a song for y’all today!
TAX DODGERS: [singing] Take me out to the tax gameBail me out with the banksBuy me a bonus and tax rebateNever pay nothing, not federal or stateSo just shoot, shoot, shoot for the loopholesIt’s law, so you can’t complainWhere the one, two, three trillion you’re outSince we rigged the game.
Take me out to the tax gameFlip the bird to the crowdLosers pay taxes, we take rebatesCause we make the rules for the corporate stateAnd it’s wham, bam, slam through the loopholesWe always win, what a game!We’re the one, yes, the 1 percentAnd we have no shame!
ALEC DICKMAN: Go back to work, everyone! Strike’s over!
GENERAL ELECTRIC: Thanks for paying your taxes so we don’t have to!
GENERAL ELECTRIC 2: Get a job in China, will ya?
OCCUPONIC: We are the Occuponics, and we are the house band for the Tax Dodgers. They pay us a lot of money. I used to be in the 99 percent, but they bought me out.

Democracy Now! Interviews the (Tax) Dodgers: Going to Bat for the 1%

link to full article

At the May Day rally in New York City’s Union Square, Amy Goodman bumped into the Tax Dodgers — a baseball team on which all of the players share the same number: 1 percent.

ALEC DICKMANTAX DODGER: We’re a baseball team, and we go to bat for the 1 percent, not the 99 percent. We’re the Tax Dodgers, the best team that corporate money can buy.

AMY GOODMAN: And can you describe what you’ve got here?

ALEC DICKMAN: Well, we’ve got our full baseball team out here, and we’ve got all the best heavy hitters in corporate America who are part of our team: Verizon, GE, Citibank, ExxonMobil, Pfizer, Bank of America, Time Warner. You know them all. We’re practically household names at this point.

AMY GOODMAN: And what’s this that we’ve got here? It says “Loopholes”?

ALEC DICKMAN: Well, no baseball team is complete without their cheerleaders, and these are our corporate hula hoopers, the Loopholes.

AMY GOODMAN: Can you tell me who you are?

CORPORATE LOOPHOLE: I’m a corporate loophole. I’m what allows these guys to get out of paying taxes and to receive rebates that are billions of dollars beyong.

AMY GOODMAN: So are you guys a winning team?

ALEC DICKMAN: We always win, because we bought the refs, and we own the stadium, and we get to change the scoreboard.

GENERAL ELECTRICTAX DODGER: The game is rigged.

ALEC DICKMAN: The game is rigged.

GENERAL ELECTRIC: The game is rigged.

MAN WITH MONEY BAGS: Thanks for my new boat.

AMY GOODMAN: What did you say?

MAN WITH MONEY BAGS: Thanks for my new boat. You should come see it.

AMY GOODMAN: So, why are you smiling then? You’d think—I mean, baseball is sort of supposed to be like good for America. You think you guys are good for America?

ALEC DICKMAN: Well, you know, what’s good for the 1 percent isn’t necessarily good for America. And we know a lot of people are out there suffering, and they paid their taxes in order to make some sort of sacrifice for the common good. But for us, Tax Day is payday. Some of the biggest corporations in America actually make money on Tax Day. For example, GE, which made over $4 billion in profits, then paid no taxes and got $3 billion in tax refunds and rebates. That’s a negative-76 percent tax rate. So that’s all money that’s coming back to us.

AMY GOODMAN: GE, you mean General Electric.

ALEC DICKMAN: General Electric.

AMY GOODMAN: Isn’t that headed by Jeffrey Immelt, President Obama’s drug czar?

ALEC DICKMAN: Yeah, that’s absolutely true. But, you know, we’re able to—we’re a very elite team, so we get wined and dined by, you know, everyone in the country, including the President.

AMY GOODMAN: What’s your name?

ALEC DICKMAN: My name is Alec Dickman.

AMY GOODMAN: And what about everyone else? Are you—what base do you play, or what position?

GENERAL ELECTRIC: I’m the heavy hitter, the cleanup. I represent GE.

AMY GOODMAN: How about you?

BANK OF AMERICATAX DODGER: I’m Bank of America. I’m a job creator, so, you know, all that tax revenue is really helping get the economy going, so keep it coming. Keep it coming.

AMY GOODMAN: How about you?

VERIZONTAX DODGER: I’m Verizon.

AMY GOODMAN: You are.

VERIZON: Yes.

AMY GOODMAN: And what are you doing with that bat?

VERIZON: With this bat, I’m ready to knock one out of left field for the 1 percent.

AMY GOODMAN: And how about you?

GENERAL ELECTRIC 2, TAX DODGER: Me? I’m General Electric.

AMY GOODMAN: There’s two General Electrics here.

GENERAL ELECTRIC 2: That’s OK. We play in twos when it’s corporate America.

ALEC DICKMAN: We don’t need to play fair.

AMY GOODMAN: OK, well, thanks very much.

ALEC DICKMAN: You want a song?

AMY GOODMAN: You have a song?

ALEC DICKMAN: Oh, we’ve got a song. You guys—

GENERAL ELECTRIC 2: Oh, yeah.

ALEC DICKMAN: Keeping it clean, keeping it clean.

GENERAL ELECTRIC 2: All right.

ALEC DICKMAN: Here we go! We got a song for y’all today!

TAX DODGERS: [singing] Take me out to the tax game
Bail me out with the banks
Buy me a bonus and tax rebate
Never pay nothing, not federal or state
So just shoot, shoot, shoot for the loopholes
It’s law, so you can’t complain
Where the one, two, three trillion you’re out
Since we rigged the game.

Take me out to the tax game
Flip the bird to the crowd
Losers pay taxes, we take rebates
Cause we make the rules for the corporate state
And it’s wham, bam, slam through the loopholes
We always win, what a game!
We’re the one, yes, the 1 percent
And we have no shame!

ALEC DICKMAN: Go back to work, everyone! Strike’s over!

GENERAL ELECTRIC: Thanks for paying your taxes so we don’t have to!

GENERAL ELECTRIC 2: Get a job in China, will ya?

OCCUPONIC: We are the Occuponics, and we are the house band for the Tax Dodgers. They pay us a lot of money. I used to be in the 99 percent, but they bought me out.


Protest Gets a Pedestal Among Baseball’s Greats
By COLIN MOYNIHAN
Published: July 22, 2012
Some of the thousands of people who gathered in Cooperstown, N.Y., on Sunday for the annual induction ceremony into the National Baseball Hall of Fame no doubt visited the attached museum to gaze at items connected to memorable moments or the greats of the game.
But one display, near the center of an exhibit called “Today’s Game,” may have surprised some visitors because of its ties to the Occupy Wall Street movement.
Inside a glass case was a white jersey with flowing blue lettering and a blue hat that might seem vaguely familiar to Brooklynites of a certain vintage. The team name, however, was the Tax Dodgers; the hat displayed a 1 percent logo.

The items, which were donated by a satirical street theater group tied to Occupy Wall Street, have been included in the Hall of Fame Museum not because of their political content but because they reflect baseball’s prominent place in the national landscape, said Tom Shieber, senior curator at the museum.
“Baseball is a pervasive part of the American vernacular,” Mr. Shieber said. “It’s a language we all speak.”
The idea to form the Tax Dodgers came early in 2012. A group of Occupy Wall Street activists formed a street theater group to satirize people and companies that use lobbying or loopholes to lower the amount of taxes they pay or to eliminate payments altogether.
The group roamed through Midtown Manhattan on tax day, April 17, swinging baseball bats and singing about economic deception to the tune of “Take Me Out to the Ball Game.” They visited the Eighth Avenue post office where last-minute filers were standing in line, said Gan Golan, a member of the group, and brought a giant cardboard baseball mitt, emblazoned with the word “Mitt,” to a Romney fund-raiser at the Trump Tower on Fifth Avenue.
As a result of such appearances, the Tax Dodgers gained a modest following, and a friend of Mr. Shieber’s sent him a clip of the group in action. Mr. Shieber said he was interested in how the group used baseball imagery to communicate a political message, something that many others had done in the past.
For instance, Mr. Shieber said, the museum already owned sheet music for patriotic songs written in 1943 that used baseball metaphors to buoy spirits during World War II, and it had a Currier and Ives lithograph from 1860 depicting Abraham Lincoln and other presidential candidates using baseball idioms to analyze their electoral prospects.
Mr. Shieber asked the Tax Dodgers if they would donate a uniform, and the group sent one by overnight mail. In July, several members of the team drove to Cooperstown, in uniform and accompanied by two cheerleaders. They arrived to find one of their shirts along with a 1 percent cap and a plaque designed by the museum. Next to it was the bat that the Texas Rangers outfielder Josh Hamilton had used on May 8 to hit four home runs in one game.
Mr. Golan, 38, an artist and writer who moved from Oakland to Brooklyn when Occupy protests began last fall, said that he was pleased with the display and hoped that it would help the group’s message reach a wider audience. He added that he had never expected the Tax Dodgers to gain the company of players like Willie Mays and Walter Johnson.
“We’re playing the bad guys, and those guys are heroes,” he said.
—————————————————————————-
A version of this article appeared in print on July 23, 2012, on page A18 of the New York edition with the headline: Protest Gets a Pedestal Among Baseball’s Greats.

Protest Gets a Pedestal Among Baseball’s Greats

By COLIN MOYNIHAN

Published: July 22, 2012

Some of the thousands of people who gathered in Cooperstown, N.Y., on Sunday for the annual induction ceremony into the National Baseball Hall of Fame no doubt visited the attached museum to gaze at items connected to memorable moments or the greats of the game.

But one display, near the center of an exhibit called “Today’s Game,” may have surprised some visitors because of its ties to the Occupy Wall Street movement.

Inside a glass case was a white jersey with flowing blue lettering and a blue hat that might seem vaguely familiar to Brooklynites of a certain vintage. The team name, however, was the Tax Dodgers; the hat displayed a 1 percent logo.

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The items, which were donated by a satirical street theater group tied to Occupy Wall Street, have been included in the Hall of Fame Museum not because of their political content but because they reflect baseball’s prominent place in the national landscape, said Tom Shieber, senior curator at the museum.

“Baseball is a pervasive part of the American vernacular,” Mr. Shieber said. “It’s a language we all speak.”

The idea to form the Tax Dodgers came early in 2012. A group of Occupy Wall Street activists formed a street theater group to satirize people and companies that use lobbying or loopholes to lower the amount of taxes they pay or to eliminate payments altogether.

The group roamed through Midtown Manhattan on tax day, April 17, swinging baseball bats and singing about economic deception to the tune of “Take Me Out to the Ball Game.” They visited the Eighth Avenue post office where last-minute filers were standing in line, said Gan Golan, a member of the group, and brought a giant cardboard baseball mitt, emblazoned with the word “Mitt,” to a Romney fund-raiser at the Trump Tower on Fifth Avenue.

As a result of such appearances, the Tax Dodgers gained a modest following, and a friend of Mr. Shieber’s sent him a clip of the group in action. Mr. Shieber said he was interested in how the group used baseball imagery to communicate a political message, something that many others had done in the past.

For instance, Mr. Shieber said, the museum already owned sheet music for patriotic songs written in 1943 that used baseball metaphors to buoy spirits during World War II, and it had a Currier and Ives lithograph from 1860 depicting Abraham Lincoln and other presidential candidates using baseball idioms to analyze their electoral prospects.

Mr. Shieber asked the Tax Dodgers if they would donate a uniform, and the group sent one by overnight mail. In July, several members of the team drove to Cooperstown, in uniform and accompanied by two cheerleaders. They arrived to find one of their shirts along with a 1 percent cap and a plaque designed by the museum. Next to it was the bat that the Texas Rangers outfielder Josh Hamilton had used on May 8 to hit four home runs in one game.

Mr. Golan, 38, an artist and writer who moved from Oakland to Brooklyn when Occupy protests began last fall, said that he was pleased with the display and hoped that it would help the group’s message reach a wider audience. He added that he had never expected the Tax Dodgers to gain the company of players like Willie Mays and Walter Johnson.

“We’re playing the bad guys, and those guys are heroes,” he said.

—————————————————————————-

A version of this article appeared in print on July 23, 2012, on page A18 of the New York edition with the headline: Protest Gets a Pedestal Among Baseball’s Greats.

A NEW FOOTBALL TEAM!
THE NY 99ERS TAKE THE FIELD

(Video from CNN iReport)
On the day of the NFL Draft Pick, and at the same time that Mitt Romney was holding a private fundraiser with fellow 1 percenter and NY Jets Owner, a new football team, the NY 99ers, appeared on the scene. They stormed the Marriot Marquis hotel in Times Square where the meeting was taking place, chanting: “We. Are. The 99%. Hoowah!”
The text of their speech follows: 
MEDIA COVERAGE:
MSNBC: The Ed Show - NY 99ers form defensive line 


PHOTOS:



    

A NEW FOOTBALL TEAM!

THE NY 99ERS TAKE THE FIELD

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(Video from CNN iReport)

On the day of the NFL Draft Pick, and at the same time that Mitt Romney was holding a private fundraiser with fellow 1 percenter and NY Jets Owner, a new football team, the NY 99ers, appeared on the scene. They stormed the Marriot Marquis hotel in Times Square where the meeting was taking place, chanting: “We. Are. The 99%. Hoowah!”

The text of their speech follows: 

MEDIA COVERAGE:

MSNBC: The Ed Show - NY 99ers form defensive line 

PHOTOS:

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Why build a library in honor of someone who does not even like to read? Instead, we proudly present The George W. Bush Librarium, an interactive theme park.

Why build a library in honor of someone who does not even like to read? Instead, we proudly present The George W. Bush Librarium, an interactive theme park.

A PENNY FOR YOUR TAXES
On Tax Day, April 17th, the Tax Dodgers baseball team and members of United NY took to the streets and distributed thousands of envelopes to bystanders with a label  ’REAL MONEY’ on the front. As each person took the envelope, they were told that inside each envelope was an amount of money greater than the taxes that GE, Verizon, Bank of America and a number of other corporations paid in taxes combined. All true. 
When they opened the envelopes, they found a single penny. It was glued to the following message: 

A PENNY FOR YOUR TAXES

On Tax Day, April 17th, the Tax Dodgers baseball team and members of United NY took to the streets and distributed thousands of envelopes to bystanders with a label  ’REAL MONEY’ on the front. As each person took the envelope, they were told that inside each envelope was an amount of money greater than the taxes that GE, Verizon, Bank of America and a number of other corporations paid in taxes combined. All true. 

When they opened the envelopes, they found a single penny. It was glued to the following message: 

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F@#k THE SMURFS! 
Check out  THE SERFS!

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F@#k THE SMURFS!

Check out  THE SERFS!

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